We had six tracks including: Government, Workplace, Communities, Media (social and public), Education, Families and Youth

Government – How does incivility manifest in government and politics, national, state, and local? How does incivility impede all peoples’ voices from being heard, and make it more difficult to reach common ground? Are there any positive signs that civility can re-emerge? We will explore what various actors – elected officials, government employees, and citizens – can do and are already doing to promote civility.

Workplace – How does incivility manifest in workplaces? How is it experienced by customers, employees, managers, and executives? Who are the perpetrators, targets, and bystanders in acts of incivility? This track will explore what anyone affected by incivility in the workplace can do to increase civility in workplace relationships.

Communities – How does incivility manifest in communities? What are signs of incivility? What are practices that encourage civility to increase? We will explore what various community actors, including civic organizations, religious organizations, community organizations, and individuals can do to counter incivility and defend and increase civility.

Media (social and public) – Social media platforms and news media organizations are frequently accused of furthering incivility, by promoting, publicizing, even profiting from it. What needs to change, and how to make this occur? What are the incentives and disincentives to their doing so? What actions are social media and journalism taking to help civility stage a comeback? This track will explore the possibilities for what roles these vital institutions can play, and how all of us can be wise consumers as well as advocates for increased civility.

Education – How does incivility show up in schools – elementary, middle, and high schools – and on college and university campuses? What are schools and colleges/universities doing to teach and practice civility at each of these levels? Are they doing less than they used to? What more needs to be done? We will explore the roles that educators, educational administrators, parents, and of course students themselves play and can play to strengthen civility.

Families and Youth – Does civility begin at home, and start in childhood? Certainly, habits of behavior, how to treat others, and how to discuss and resolve conflicts are all begun early. What can family members, especially parents, do to raise children who are thoughtful problem-solvers and engaged citizens? Do families need help in doing this from other institutions in society? This track will explore the critical role played by families and youth in creating a society characterized by civility.